Ad Spot

More winter to come  

By Clif Knight 

As you can see, cold weather is having its way in north Alabama. Sub-freezing temperatures in January brought us our first measurable snow, and more is in the making if the weather prognosticator is right.  

Groundhog Day was Feb. 2. According to tradition, the holiday’s namesake sneaks out of hibernation to look around and assess the future of winter weather. On this year’s Groundhog Day, the critter saw its shadow and supposedly returned to its hole, signifying six more weeks of winter weather. 

I can’t vouch for the accuracy of a groundhog’s guesswork, but I can see some of the signs of warmer weather.  

For example, the thorn bush that is visible through our north-facing kitchen window is full of red blossoms. I have never known it not to bloom in January.  

Wild onion plants are scattered throughout our yard, early daffodils are popping up in our flowerbeds, and buds are swelling on the limbs of our giant backyard Bradford pear tree.  

Soon, the yellow buds of dandelions will dot the yard, and it will be time for the riding lawnmower to take over. 

A good general cleanup outside will be the first order of business when the temperature warms up a bit. Late-falling leaves from shade trees have to be picked up and carted off to my mulch pile, and hundreds of dead limbs from trees have to be picked up and sent to the city dump.  

A considerable amount of work remains to be done in my garden before the next growing season. Tomato cages, green bean sticks and corn stalks are still standing and need to be removed, as well as row after row of dead weeds and grass.  

If you have a tractor that’s equipped with a disc harrow and turning plow, it can be used to crush the waste and mix it with the soil. This is a good way to conserve moisture and produce nutrients for future crops.  

With inflation taking a bigger bite out of the food dollar, any investment you make to grow your own fruits and vegetables will pay off big time. A small backyard garden is all the space you need to grow vegetables such as squash, tomatoes, cucumbers, okra, peppers and green beans. All you’ll need is a few dollars for seed and fertilizer, a few hand tools and a strong back. 

News

HIS students help clean up effort at Mt. Tabor Cemetery 

News

Lovely landscape

News

Morgan buys SUVs to transport seniors, deliver meals

News

Morgan County Sheriff’s Office to let citizens behind the scenes with academy  

News

Morgan teen exhibits grand champion at Alabama National Fair

News

Murder-for-hire defendant seeks bond

MULTIMEDIA-FRONT PAGE

Stadthagen supports

News

SALUTE

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Second grade students in Hartselle honor heroes

News

Alabama DHR accepting applications for next round of child care bonuses 

At a Glance

Vinemont man killed in single-vehicle crash

At a Glance

Littlest Christmas Tree Farm opens Friday

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Marching on: Pride of Priceville has ‘stellar’ season  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle scores A on state report card, down two points from 2018

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle man sentenced to 179 years in prison for sex crimes  

At a Glance

‘Have a Hart’ information session to be held Dec. 2 

brewer

Cotaco students celebrate Thanksgiving with school-wide parade

Hartselle

Divided Hartselle school board picks Clayton for next superintendent 

At a Glance

Historical Society plans 2023 lunch, learn series

At a Glance

Santa’s Workshop Vintage Market returns this weekend

Hartselle

Superintendent finalists interviewed for vacant position  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle Junior High honors veterans at annual program

Hartselle

Christmas in the Park returns Dec. 3

Morgan Countian

Cotaco service center opens for county business  

x