The bliss of retirement

The first two months of retirement have been busier than I expected. Boredom has not yet become an operative word.

Early on, I was aware that some catching up needed to be done in the yard and garden, after spending the summer of 2015 on the sidelines recuperating from hip surgeries. Little did I realize how quickly grass, weeds and other unwanted vegetation could overtake a hedgerow of shrubbery, flowerbeds or garden. When that happens, cleanup can come only at the expense of some back breaking manual labor.

In my case, converting from a largely inside desk job in a climate controlled environment to an outside job in 90-plus degree temperatures was a concern. Luckily, I have been able to adjust thanks to a broad-brimmed straw hat, shade trees, an ample supply of sweat rags, cool water and power equipment.

Nonetheless, my list of “to do” jobs seems to be getting bigger under ideal growing conditions – sunshine, high humidity and frequent afternoon thunder showers.  No sooner is one task completed than another one pops up begging for attention.

I’m amazed that what I used to do on weekday afternoons and Saturdays away from the job is now taking five to six hours a day six days a week. Perhaps that’s because each job is given more time and attention. For example, every blade of grass is now being bagged and dumped in a mulch pile. In addition, we have a long, deep drainage ditch in our front yard that can’t be mowed by a conventional mower. It used to grow grass and weeds two feet tall and was partially moved by the city’s street department one or two times a year.  Today, it is being maintained with the use of a weed eater.

Our family vegetable garden is another labor-intensive project. Preparing seedbeds and planting is always a time consuming task but controlling weeds, insects and varmit damage continues throughout the growing season. This year, we opted to devote the time and labor needed to have a fall garden. While early vegetables are in their last harvest stage, others such as mustard, turnip greens, radishes, squash, cucumbers and tomatoes will soon be ready to harvest.

What I’ve enjoyed the most about retirement is the flexibility it gives you spending the days you have doing what you enjoy doing without being under the command of time or workload.

 

Clif Knight is a staff writer emeritus for the Hartselle Enquirer.

Falkville

Larry Madison has been a pillar in Falkville for four decades

Hartselle

Hartselle trio nominated for two K-LOVE awards

Hartselle

Hartselle students chosen to attend Girls State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle Kiwanis Club continues scholarly legacy with annual golf tournament

Editor's picks

Heartbreaking finish: Hartselle comes up a run short in state baseball finals

Decatur

Fallen Morgan County officers remembered, families honored  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle drops Game 1 to Hillcrest, needs two wins for state title

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Despite title loss, Hartselle thankful for state experience 

Editor's picks

Hartselle baseball legend dies

Breaking News

Hartselle baseball legend William Booth dies at 79

At a Glance

ALDOT patching area of Thompson Road tomorrow, Thursday

At a Glance

Spring-time market day in Hartselle scheduled for May 18 

Hartselle

New Crestline Elementary School welcomes students

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle industry closing, affecting more than 150 jobs  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Habitat for Humanity applications for homeownership available June 3 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

State seeking death penalty for Fort Payne woman accused of pushing victim off cliff

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Pilot of ultralight dies in Hartselle plane crash

Editor's picks

Northern lights visible from north Alabama

Hartselle

Hartselle students to attend Boys State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

High scorers: 42 Hartselle students a part of ACT 30 plus club

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle projects budget surplus based on midyear numbers 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Planned Hartselle library already piquing interest 

Brewer

Students use practical life skills at Morgan County 4-H competition

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

After 13 years underground, the cicadas are coming 

x