There comes a time…

It happens to everyone sooner or later… The moment arrives when it’s time to put down what you’re doing, take a break and decide what you want to do with the rest of your life.

That time arrived for me a few days ago when I made my decision to retire after 52 years in the newspaper business. After June 29, my role with the Hartselle Enquirer will be limited to part time assignments.

As I reflect on the 48 years I was a full time employee of this newspaper, I am reminded of the vast change that has occurred in both the production of the Hartselle Enquirer and the community it serves.

In 1961, hot metal was used to set text and headline type. Editorial copy and advertisements were locked in page-size metal frames and placed on a flatbed press where the printing process occurred. The back shop carried the day and the heat and  smoke from hot metal and the screeching sounds of electric saws cutting through metal were par for the course. A writer’s equipment consisted of a manual typewriter, a Polaroid camera and a pica stick.

The introduction of offset printing in the late 1960s and early 1970s brought about a major change in the newspaper industry. Electric tape punch machines replaced hot metal casting machines, cut and paste techniques made page markup faster and more efficient, automated cameras expanded the use of photos and new high-speed presses ushered in larger press runs and full-color photos.

Desktop publishing is today’s standard. Copy is produced electronically on site and transmitted to a central printing plant for publication.

When my wife Geanell and I made our first visit to Hartselle we were reminded that we were moving to a farming town with growth potential. As we drove north on Sparkman Street, we passed a farmer driving two mules hitched to a wagon load of cotton.

“Don’t that make you  feel like you’re  home,” I questioned her. “Don’t forget,” she replied. “Before we got married, I told you I wasn’t going to marry a farmer.”

My first week on the job we reported that Coy Atkins brought the first bale of cotton to Sivley Cotton Co. to be ginned; Hal Lee, then 16, was in Richmond, Va. competing in the Eastern States tractor driving Contest, the town council voted $1,000 to purchase an industrial site for Snow Shell Egg Co. and council members Troy Nunn and John D. Long were photographed helping Police Chief M. L. Looney destroy 31 gallons of confiscated moonshine whiskey, five cases of beer and several bottles of bonded liquor.

From then until now, there has been a long run of strides taken to make Hartselle a good place to live and raise a family. We feel fortunate to be among its many transplanted families and are certainly grateful to the many who have supported and helped us along the way.

 

Clif Knight is a staff writer for the Hartselle Enquirer.

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Hartselle trio nominated for two K-LOVE awards

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Hartselle students chosen to attend Girls State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle Kiwanis Club continues scholarly legacy with annual golf tournament

Editor's picks

Heartbreaking finish: Hartselle comes up a run short in state baseball finals

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Fallen Morgan County officers remembered, families honored  

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Hartselle drops Game 1 to Hillcrest, needs two wins for state title

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Despite title loss, Hartselle thankful for state experience 

Editor's picks

Hartselle baseball legend dies

Breaking News

Hartselle baseball legend William Booth dies at 79

At a Glance

ALDOT patching area of Thompson Road tomorrow, Thursday

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Spring-time market day in Hartselle scheduled for May 18 

Hartselle

New Crestline Elementary School welcomes students

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle industry closing, affecting more than 150 jobs  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Habitat for Humanity applications for homeownership available June 3 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

State seeking death penalty for Fort Payne woman accused of pushing victim off cliff

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Pilot of ultralight dies in Hartselle plane crash

Editor's picks

Northern lights visible from north Alabama

Hartselle

Hartselle students to attend Boys State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

High scorers: 42 Hartselle students a part of ACT 30 plus club

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Hartselle projects budget surplus based on midyear numbers 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Planned Hartselle library already piquing interest 

Brewer

Students use practical life skills at Morgan County 4-H competition

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

After 13 years underground, the cicadas are coming 

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