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Dixie is turning yellow

Leada Gore
Editor

Last week’s column centered on all the great reasons people choose to live in the South. Lest I be accused of looking at the area through magnolia-covered glasses, let me say I do realize this part of the country faces many challenges.

Southerners can be strange, silly and downright weird. It seems as if there are times when common sense is as rare as hen’s teeth, to use a Southern expression.

The geographic area brings its own set of challenges, too.

The South is not the place to be if you like an abundance of snow and cold weather.

Or if you want to see cities populated with large skyscrapers.

Or, if you’re real picky and just have to drive only on paved roads.

And then there’s pollen.

Pollen – the fine yellowy powder produced by certain plants that’s the bane of any allergy sufferer – exists throughout the country but seems to be particularly prevalent in this part of the country. Perhaps it’s all the warm weather lending itself to a longer growing season, thus more blossoms and more pollen.

Whatever the reason, all you have to do is visit a local car wash or doctor’s office to see the effects of the yellow stuff. Car washes (whose owners may be the only ones happy to see so much pollen as its requires an almost daily visit to their businesses) are packed with patrons who’d like to be able to see out of their window.

Doctor’s offices are filled with people seeking some relief from the drip, drip, drip that is their sinuses. Drug store shelves are lined with products designed to help solve the problem and it seems everyone is armed with a tissue – just in case.

With forecasters predicting days of dry, sunny weather, there is little chance for rain to wash all our yellow misery away. In the meantime, all we can do is follow the advice of experts: change your clothes after coming in from outside; close windows and use the air conditioner; limit exposure whenever possible.

Yeah, sure. We all know this won’t happen. It’s simply too pretty to stay inside, a side effect from living in the South and its beautiful spring weather.

So, as with so many things in life, we will just have to take the good with the bad.

Dixie is yellow. And that’s the way it’s going to stay for a while.

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