Your opinions

By Staff
The following was written by Jim Bombard of Hartselle. It was submitted by Florence Clowes of Vero Beach, Fla.
The joys of yard work
I tend to the yard work, weather permitting on Saturdays. Weather not permitting, I do it the next week. I cut the grass on my 1940 small city sized lot, with a push reel lawn mower.
I find the gentle whirl sound pleasant and a reminder of my grandfather. He loved to tinker with these wooden handled cutting machines. People marvel that a silent, person- propelled, 18-inch wide machine is sufficient; I say if you need a big noisy machine you got too much yard.
When my grandson was six and seven he would love to push the mower, although the missing motor bothered him for a long time. I just told him it was a little boy-powered lawn mower. He would cut circles, stripes and squares. I figured any cutting is good cutting and would fill in the rest. Now that he is big enough to actually cut the grass he never seems to be around on grass day.
The real problem with any reel mower is that it only cuts grass. The smelly noisy machines will chew up and spit out twigs, bags, branches– any thing low enough to get under the machine. Not the reel mower– it only cuts neat and not too tall grass. So before I cut the grass I have to walk the yard pulling the large brown recycle bin picking up the twigs and sticks that fall from the two stately, spreading, tall oak trees in the postage-size front yard. I imagine the first lady of the house planting them after she moved in, she drove the markers in the dirt and her husband dug the holes, one on each side of the curved sidewalk to the mail box. The tress are very big now, their heavy braches stretch across the street on one side and over the yard towards the house on the other. The branches are slender as they reach over our yellow house's roof, they shade and protect the house like a mother's caring fingers. The branches hold the house in place, caressing and gripping each end. Gently they wave, placing dappled shadows on our little porch and roof. Each leaf seems perfectly placed to shade and dance in the breezes. Each giant tree also drops leaves and branches in the yard during the week.
I have noticed a difference in the volume and placement of clutter from one tree to the other .The one on the right will drop a few delicate twigs. The mess will be arranged in a neat semi circle around the base. It is always an easy clean up job on that side of the sidewalk. The one on the left will shed branches, leaves, twigs and an occasional pine cone. The mess will be all over the side of the yard and into the garden. I will have to pick up the tree debris and an occasional bottle and then rake the area, before I can cut the grass. Based on these observations I have named the tree on the right Denise. The tree on the left is a Mike.
On Saturday you will see me pushing the mower, watching the grass leap from the blades to tumble back down to the lawn. I listen to the monotonous clicking sound the mower makes, occasionally taking a break on the old shaded bench. If you ask right, and I need another break I just may let you push awhile.

Falkville

Larry Madison has been a pillar in Falkville for four decades

Hartselle

Hartselle trio nominated for two K-LOVE awards

Hartselle

Hartselle students chosen to attend Girls State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle Kiwanis Club continues scholarly legacy with annual golf tournament

Editor's picks

Heartbreaking finish: Hartselle comes up a run short in state baseball finals

Decatur

Fallen Morgan County officers remembered, families honored  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle drops Game 1 to Hillcrest, needs two wins for state title

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Despite title loss, Hartselle thankful for state experience 

Editor's picks

Hartselle baseball legend dies

Breaking News

Hartselle baseball legend William Booth dies at 79

At a Glance

ALDOT patching area of Thompson Road tomorrow, Thursday

At a Glance

Spring-time market day in Hartselle scheduled for May 18 

Hartselle

New Crestline Elementary School welcomes students

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle industry closing, affecting more than 150 jobs  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Habitat for Humanity applications for homeownership available June 3 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

State seeking death penalty for Fort Payne woman accused of pushing victim off cliff

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Pilot of ultralight dies in Hartselle plane crash

Editor's picks

Northern lights visible from north Alabama

Hartselle

Hartselle students to attend Boys State

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

High scorers: 42 Hartselle students a part of ACT 30 plus club

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Hartselle projects budget surplus based on midyear numbers 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Planned Hartselle library already piquing interest 

Brewer

Students use practical life skills at Morgan County 4-H competition

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

After 13 years underground, the cicadas are coming 

x