Ad Spot

Options abound for senior housing

By Staff
When people buy homes, often a sense of permanence comes with that purchase. For those closer to middle age, a home is bought with the idea that it's the place you'll spend the rest of your life. As many homeowners find out, however, that's often not the case.
A multitude of reasons exist why senior citizens often decide to sell their homes and seek other living options. A greater sense of freedom, for instance, that allows seniors to shirk some of the responsibilities that come with home ownership and travel more frequently is one reason. Another common reason for selling the house is to be closer to family, giving many seniors the chance to visit their grandchildren more frequently. Yet another reason is health. Some seniors find it's simply too difficult to make it around or maintain a home that was once perfect for a big family, but is now just too large and time-consuming to keep in shape.
Such a wide variety of reasons is matched by the many housing options seniors have when they decide to sell their homes. Each option offers a uniquely different experience, depending on the individual's needs.
Retirement Community
These are often age-restricted, so younger retirees looking for a place to rest their head during weeks when they're not out jetsetting around the world might not qualify. Typically, retirement communities are limited to people ages 55 and over, or ages 62 and over. The former communities are open to residents under the minimum age as long as they live with someone who meets the requirement. The latter communities, however, often require all residents meet the minimum age standard.
Retirement communities are also more attuned to active senior citizens, who prefer activities, which are typically offered by the community. Laws used to mandate such activities be offered, but that's no longer the case. Still, most communities have maintained the practice, making these places one of the more ideal options for seniors looking to lessen some of their responsibility but maintain an active lifestyle.
Congregate Housing
Congregate housing is similar to senior apartments. Seniors live in separate apartments that they can either rent or purchase. Congregate housing typically offers programs for recreation and other opportunities for seniors to get to know their neighbors. Oftentimes, seniors who choose to live in such communities do so within a relatively small proximity to where they owned their home, meaning they're more likely to see familiar faces.
In addition to recreation, congregate housing also typically offers additional services, such as Alzheimer's care, assisted living and even nursing in separate residences on the premise. Planned meals, trips, and even regular religious services (be they on-premises or organized as trips) are also typical of these living situations.
Seniors-Only Apartments
It's easy to confuse seniors-only apartments with congregate housing, though they're not entirely similar. Categories of seniors-only apartments differ greatly, depending on rent. Market-rate apartments are typically affordable, while above-market rate are more luxurious, an amenity that will be costly. Seniors who haven't rented in a while might raise an eyebrow or two at the cost of rent. Laws regulate rents as to their affordability, but what might be affordable is not necessarily amenable. In addition, geography often dictates rents, and senior housing is no exception to that unwritten rule.
Similar to congregate housing, seniors-only apartments often offer activities and meals for residents to do together. However, unlike congregate housing, seniors-only apartments typically do not offer additional services such as Alzheimer's care or nursing services. This can and should be a consideration, as those looking for a place might not want to move again in the unfortunate circumstance their health takes a turn for the worse.
Assisted Living
Assisted living does just what its name implies: helps seniors who might struggle with some of the daily chores of everyday life. Though no medical attention is typically offered, assisted-living staff are there to help remind residents when it's time to take medication, help them get dressed or bathe if need be, or help with laundry and other chores that seniors might find aren't as easy as they once were.
Living units are private, so a sense of independence is still there. In fact, many assisted-living facilities allow and encourage residents to be as independent as possible, though it's implied help is there if needed.
These facilities are often best for those who have only mild impairment, be it physical or mental. Mild mental impairment is where things like medication schedules and doctors appointments, which most facilities offer transportation to and from, are especially valuable. Mild physical impairment can be countered with assisted living services such as assistance bathing, getting dressed or getting around town.

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Annual Christmas parade to be held Thursday  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Some concerned over new Hartselle superintendent hire  

At a Glance

Town of Falkville to hold Christmas in the Park Sunday

At a Glance

Hartselle Holiday Market returns Saturday

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Old Hartselle post office to become event center, new home for chamber  

At a Glance

‘Have a Hart’ information session to be held Dec. 2

Morgan County

Future leader

News

Alabama DHR accepting applications for next round of child care bonuses 

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Spirit of Thanksgiving: Volunteers deliver 266 food bags on holiday for Meals on Wheels  

At a Glance

Morgan County Sheriff’s Office to let citizens behind the scenes with academy  

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Winter window wonderland  

At a Glance

Council to interview candidates for Parks and Rec director job  

Hartselle

Live nativity scene returns to First Christian Dec. 7-10

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Local church prepares 400 Thanksgiving meals

News

HIS students help clean up effort at Mt. Tabor Cemetery 

News

Lovely landscape

News

Morgan buys SUVs to transport seniors, deliver meals

News

Morgan County Sheriff’s Office to let citizens behind the scenes with academy  

News

Morgan teen exhibits grand champion at Alabama National Fair

News

Murder-for-hire defendant seeks bond

MULTIMEDIA-FRONT PAGE

Stadthagen supports

News

SALUTE

FRONT PAGE FEATURED

Second grade students in Hartselle honor heroes

News

Alabama DHR accepting applications for next round of child care bonuses 

x