Of baby booties and senate races…

By Staff
Oops.
That's probably what those in Julian McPhillips' Senate campaign are saying after last week's statements about his opponent, Susan Parker.
McPhillips and Parker are Democrats, both seeking the nomination for U.S. Senate. They will meet again in the June 25 runoff to see who will face Republican Jeff Sessions.
It seems McPhillips – the father of three – came out shaking a rattle, saying he doubted his opponent could understand family issues, as she had no children.
Parker replied, saying she had suffered a miscarrage and her doctors advised her not to have children after that incident.
McPhillips – who later apologized – was left with egg on his face.
But come to think of it, he may have a point. After all, wouldn't we prefer a politician whose life experiences most match our own?
McPhillips is safe on one respect. He, like some 71 percent of Alabamians, is white.
He's out of luck with women, though. Since he's not one, he can count on losing that 51.7 percent of the population's vote.
And since 13 pecent of Alabama's residents are older than 65 – McPhillips is 55 – he can count those out, too.
McPhillips also might be in trouble with the garden variety blue collar workers that make up most of Alabama's population. McPhillips is a lawyer, one of about 9,500 in the state.
Of course, McPhillips might lose a couple of points on the income issue. The average household income in Alabama is $30,790. McPhillips is a multi-millionaire. Since multi-millionaires make up less than 1 percent of the state's population, it's going to be hard to count on them for a victory.
So, let's figure this out… McPhillips can rule out African Americans; women; anyone older or younger than 55; anyone other than an attorney; and anyone who is not a multi-millionaire.
If you use his logic, he represents white, middle-aged male attorneys who just so happened to be multi-millionaires. That describes just about all of Alabama, doesn't it?
Wait, I left something out. Make that white, middle-aged, male attorneys who just so happen to be multi-millionaires with children.
Apparently, one can't serve in the Senate without them.

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